Bright light in the sky above Cornbury or further

Christine Battersby
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Wed 1 Feb, 09:49

The Guardian article of yesterday is helpful in telling people where to look.

There's also a picture, and a suggestion that it can be seen with the naked eye (but better with binoculars): https://www.theguardian.com/science/2023/jan/31/what-is-the-green-comet-and-how-can-you-see-it

Rachel Ramsay
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Wed 1 Feb, 07:44

I don’t think it was the comet, apropos the title of this thread. Best chance of seeing it tonight but only if you’re in an area with low light pollution and have binoculars. 
www.bbc.co.uk/news/science-environment-64388483

“You might have seen these reports saying we're going to get this bright green object lighting up the sky," says Dr Robert Massey, deputy executive director of the Royal Astronomical Society.

"Sadly, that's not going to be anything like the case."

Malcolm Blackmore
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Wed 25 Jan, 23:37

Without wanting to subscribe to a phone app... Where in the (clear night) sky does one look for the Green Comet from Charlbury? Say down Hundley Way?

Christine Battersby
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Tue 24 Jan, 11:35 (last edited on Tue 24 Jan, 11:35)

Plenty in the news today about the emerald green comet last seen from earth in the Stone Age, and perhaps never to be seen again. It will be closest to the earth on February 1st/2nd, and will have disappeared from view by the middle of that month.

The Guardian account says, "the cosmic ice ball has recently become bright enough to see with the naked eye, at least in very dark, rural areas with minimal light pollution. Since mid-January, the comet has been easier to spot with a telescope or binoculars. It is visible in the northern hemisphere, clouds permitting, as the sky darkens in the evening, below and to the left of the handle of the Plough constellation."

Exciting that Jean has already seen it over Cornbury. For those struggling to find the comet, the Sky Tonight app (free for a week from Play Store, and then a small subscription each week) might help as its position changes each night. Other sky maps available, of course.

Malcolm Blackmore
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Mon 23 Jan, 18:53

Had a perfect view of them taking the dogs out for a very late walkies, coming back along the unlit portion of Hundley Way, seen just above the varied and textured treeline, even though wielding hand torches to avoid potholes.

The dogs didn't seem to notice anything but sniffs abounded. Talk of differing weltanshuangs or whatever the German spelling is.

Didn't know about Jupiter. If clear tomorrow tempted to do another after-dark walkies with the pack and check out at about 10 o'clock high.

Still don't know what Skywatch is! Avid viewer of BBC Sky at Night since coming to Britain 50+ years ago now.

Steve Darnell
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Mon 23 Jan, 17:42

The planet Venus is a spectacular sight just now, to the right of the crescent Moon.

Jupiter is also clearly visible higher up in the night sky, at about 10 o’clock in relation to the Moon. A lovely clear night to go and have a look.

Malcolm Blackmore
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Sun 22 Jan, 18:53

what is Skywatch?

Jean Adams
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Sun 22 Jan, 10:18

Thank you. That is fascinating. I will certainly Sky watch on 1 February. The bright light has disappeared today so I still do not know what that was.

Rosemary Bennett
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Sat 21 Jan, 21:36

A green comet is speeding toward the inner solar system.

The comet known as C/2022 E3 (ZTF) will soon fly past the Earth, coming as close as around 26 million miles to our planet on February 1, by which point it may just about be visible to the naked eye.

Comets are astronomical objects made up of frozen gases, dust and rock that orbit the sun. Sometimes referred to as "cosmic snowballs," these objects are blasted with increasing amounts of radiation as they approach our star, releasing gases and debris.

Jean Adams
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Sat 21 Jan, 17:30 (last edited on Sat 21 Jan, 17:46)

Bright light in the sky above Cornbury or further ? I have looked through glasses but I am fascinated to know what the bright light is.

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